SKS Philippines Dahong Palay https://www.samuraikatanaswordphilippines.com/apps/photos/ SKS Philippines Dahong Palay SKS Philippines Dahong Palay The Dahong Palay (also spelled Dahon palay or Dahompalay), literally "rice leaf" in Tagalog, is a single-edged sword from the Philippines, specifically the Southern Tagalog provinces of Batangas and Mindoro. The sword's name could either be a reference to the similarity of its shape to the leaves of rice or to local green snakes "dahong palay", purported to be extremely venomous. The snake is probably green specimens of the Philippine Pit Viper, Trimeresurus flavomaculatus, though it is sometimes identified as various relatively harmless green snakes, like vine snakes. The dahong palay was originally used as a farmer's tool, for clearing thick grass growths. However, during the Philippine revolution of 1896, farmers from Batangas soon came to favor it for its slashing and thrusting "feel". https://www.samuraikatanaswordphilippines.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=204614042 204614042 SKS Philippines Dahong Palay The Dahong Palay (also spelled Dahon palay or Dahompalay), literally "rice leaf" in Tagalog, is a single-edged sword from the Philippines, specifically the Southern Tagalog provinces of Batangas and Mindoro. The sword's name could either be a reference to the similarity of its shape to the leaves of rice or to local green snakes "dahong palay", purported to be extremely venomous. The snake is probably green specimens of the Philippine Pit Viper, Trimeresurus flavomaculatus, though it is sometimes identified as various relatively harmless green snakes, like vine snakes. The dahong palay was originally used as a farmer's tool, for clearing thick grass growths. However, during the Philippine revolution of 1896, farmers from Batangas soon came to favor it for its slashing and thrusting "feel". https://www.samuraikatanaswordphilippines.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=204614043 204614043 SKS Philippines Dahong Palay The Dahong Palay (also spelled Dahon palay or Dahompalay), literally "rice leaf" in Tagalog, is a single-edged sword from the Philippines, specifically the Southern Tagalog provinces of Batangas and Mindoro. The sword's name could either be a reference to the similarity of its shape to the leaves of rice or to local green snakes "dahong palay", purported to be extremely venomous. The snake is probably green specimens of the Philippine Pit Viper, Trimeresurus flavomaculatus, though it is sometimes identified as various relatively harmless green snakes, like vine snakes. The dahong palay was originally used as a farmer's tool, for clearing thick grass growths. However, during the Philippine revolution of 1896, farmers from Batangas soon came to favor it for its slashing and thrusting "feel". https://www.samuraikatanaswordphilippines.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=204614039 204614039 SKS Philippines Dahong Palay The Dahong Palay (also spelled Dahon palay or Dahompalay), literally "rice leaf" in Tagalog, is a single-edged sword from the Philippines, specifically the Southern Tagalog provinces of Batangas and Mindoro. The sword's name could either be a reference to the similarity of its shape to the leaves of rice or to local green snakes "dahong palay", purported to be extremely venomous. The snake is probably green specimens of the Philippine Pit Viper, Trimeresurus flavomaculatus, though it is sometimes identified as various relatively harmless green snakes, like vine snakes. The dahong palay was originally used as a farmer's tool, for clearing thick grass growths. However, during the Philippine revolution of 1896, farmers from Batangas soon came to favor it for its slashing and thrusting "feel". https://www.samuraikatanaswordphilippines.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=204614040 204614040 SKS Philippines Dahong Palay The Dahong Palay (also spelled Dahon palay or Dahompalay), literally "rice leaf" in Tagalog, is a single-edged sword from the Philippines, specifically the Southern Tagalog provinces of Batangas and Mindoro. The sword's name could either be a reference to the similarity of its shape to the leaves of rice or to local green snakes "dahong palay", purported to be extremely venomous. The snake is probably green specimens of the Philippine Pit Viper, Trimeresurus flavomaculatus, though it is sometimes identified as various relatively harmless green snakes, like vine snakes. The dahong palay was originally used as a farmer's tool, for clearing thick grass growths. However, during the Philippine revolution of 1896, farmers from Batangas soon came to favor it for its slashing and thrusting "feel". https://www.samuraikatanaswordphilippines.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=204614041 204614041 SKS Philippines Dahong Palay The Dahong Palay (also spelled Dahon palay or Dahompalay), literally "rice leaf" in Tagalog, is a single-edged sword from the Philippines, specifically the Southern Tagalog provinces of Batangas and Mindoro. The sword's name could either be a reference to the similarity of its shape to the leaves of rice or to local green snakes "dahong palay", purported to be extremely venomous. The snake is probably green specimens of the Philippine Pit Viper, Trimeresurus flavomaculatus, though it is sometimes identified as various relatively harmless green snakes, like vine snakes. The dahong palay was originally used as a farmer's tool, for clearing thick grass growths. However, during the Philippine revolution of 1896, farmers from Batangas soon came to favor it for its slashing and thrusting "feel". https://www.samuraikatanaswordphilippines.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=204614044 204614044 SKS Philippines Dahong Palay The Dahong Palay (also spelled Dahon palay or Dahompalay), literally "rice leaf" in Tagalog, is a single-edged sword from the Philippines, specifically the Southern Tagalog provinces of Batangas and Mindoro. The sword's name could either be a reference to the similarity of its shape to the leaves of rice or to local green snakes "dahong palay", purported to be extremely venomous. The snake is probably green specimens of the Philippine Pit Viper, Trimeresurus flavomaculatus, though it is sometimes identified as various relatively harmless green snakes, like vine snakes. The dahong palay was originally used as a farmer's tool, for clearing thick grass growths. However, during the Philippine revolution of 1896, farmers from Batangas soon came to favor it for its slashing and thrusting "feel". https://www.samuraikatanaswordphilippines.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=204614046 204614046 SKS Philippines Dahong Palay The Dahong Palay (also spelled Dahon palay or Dahompalay), literally "rice leaf" in Tagalog, is a single-edged sword from the Philippines, specifically the Southern Tagalog provinces of Batangas and Mindoro. The sword's name could either be a reference to the similarity of its shape to the leaves of rice or to local green snakes "dahong palay", purported to be extremely venomous. The snake is probably green specimens of the Philippine Pit Viper, Trimeresurus flavomaculatus, though it is sometimes identified as various relatively harmless green snakes, like vine snakes. The dahong palay was originally used as a farmer's tool, for clearing thick grass growths. However, during the Philippine revolution of 1896, farmers from Batangas soon came to favor it for its slashing and thrusting "feel". https://www.samuraikatanaswordphilippines.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=204614047 204614047 SKS Philippines Dahong Palay The Dahong Palay (also spelled Dahon palay or Dahompalay), literally "rice leaf" in Tagalog, is a single-edged sword from the Philippines, specifically the Southern Tagalog provinces of Batangas and Mindoro. The sword's name could either be a reference to the similarity of its shape to the leaves of rice or to local green snakes "dahong palay", purported to be extremely venomous. The snake is probably green specimens of the Philippine Pit Viper, Trimeresurus flavomaculatus, though it is sometimes identified as various relatively harmless green snakes, like vine snakes. The dahong palay was originally used as a farmer's tool, for clearing thick grass growths. However, during the Philippine revolution of 1896, farmers from Batangas soon came to favor it for its slashing and thrusting "feel". https://www.samuraikatanaswordphilippines.com/apps/photos/photo?photoID=204614045 204614045